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A place to grow for Hamilton’s gifted studentsA place to grow for Hamilton’s gifted studentsA place to grow for Hamilton’s gifted students

by:Tuowei     2019-09-09
Hamilton\'s talented students are missing.
It makes everything different. Zoe Branigan-
Pipe and Beth Carey lead the Center for enrichment and innovation in public schools at Holbrook Primary School.
This is a special classroom for talented students.
Children who scored around 99 percentile in standardized intelligence tests --
But then every weekschool drop-
The In program is open to all students.
Once a month, gifted students in grades 5 to 8, along with their intellectual peers, are invited to the enrichment center to spend the day
Traditional, asking. based learning.
Students take taxis from various schools in Hamilton to Holbrook, where they gather with other people from their city. Branigan-
Pipe and Carey see 350 talented students from all over the city every month through this program.
The curriculum of the concentration center does not follow the traditional teaching mode. Branigan-
Pipe and Carey said they were there to facilitate the process, not to lead it.
\"Our main goal at the center is to let students really understand themselves as learners,\" Carey said . \". As Branigan-
Pipe explained that there is no cycle or pre-
There is no clear theme, no ringing interruption, no set lunch time, and no specific transition other than the student\'s arrival and departure.
Students are encouraged to ask questions, think about possibilities, and find answers.
Recently, a class in the sixth grade genius class, the students used the computer game \"My World\" to carry out the two roads that diverged on a yellow wood mentioned in Robert Frost\'s famous poem.
Through my world\'s ability to allow players to build a 3D environment, students create a flat, easy path along the second road full of twists and turns, twists and thorns.
\"I call it \'virtual action\' because it\'s like a Lego toy-\" Brannigan said --\"Pipe.
\"Being able to build it allows them to understand it better.
Because they built the metaphor, they got it.
\"This engagement is very big.
People see my world as a game;
I see it as a tool.
\"The concentration center doesn\'t look like your typical classroom either.
There is no traditional \"pre-class\" teaching space and no specific seating.
The rooms are set up to encourage small conversation groups, including the arts center, computer lab, container garden, quiet and comfortable meeting space, and even a table where students can operate a 3D printer.
For those students who may need special attention, this is an ideal educational environment, just like those students who are on the other end of the academic field. Branigan-
Pipe says gifted students face the same stigma as disabled students.
\"People think that they will be fine because they have talent, or that we just stick to elitism,\" she said . \".
\"It is important to recognize that many gifted children drop out of school, fail or fail.
No academic talent.
This is intellectual.
We got it wrong.
We often think that gifted children are children who sit in straight rows all day doing math and science and getting.
\"The perception that the center is an elite has led to a weekly decline --in.
From 2: 30 to 4: 30 on Wednesdaym.
Students and their parents are welcome to hang out in the classroom, play my world or use a 3D printer. For 14-year-
Old Jason Amri attending the enrichment center is a pleasure.
Grade 8 Ancaster students are particularly interested in electronics and want to be a software engineer.
Decline this week
Here, Amri leads a small workshop on Arduino programming, a small board for interactive computer projects.
\"I think the structure of education here is much more free than it is in school,\" he said . \".
\"Here we are, we have a whole
Activities during the day, we chat, we discuss-
Our discussion is very rich.
This is a more classic way of teaching at school.
Someone tells you something that you have to remember before you can take the exam.
It\'s not very interesting.
\"Ereilly @ thespec. com 905-526-
2452 | @ EmmaatTheSpecHamilton\'s talented students have less way to go
It makes everything different. Zoe Branigan-
Pipe and Beth Carey lead the Center for enrichment and innovation in public schools at Holbrook Primary School.
This is a special classroom for talented students.
Children who scored around 99 percentile in standardized intelligence tests --
But then every weekschool drop-
The In program is open to all students.
Once a month, gifted students in grades 5 to 8, along with their intellectual peers, are invited to the enrichment center to spend the day
Traditional, asking. based learning.
Students take taxis from various schools in Hamilton to Holbrook, where they gather with other people from their city. Branigan-
Pipe and Carey see 350 talented students from all over the city every month through this program.
The curriculum of the concentration center does not follow the traditional teaching mode. Branigan-
Pipe and Carey said they were there to facilitate the process, not to lead it.
\"Our main goal at the center is to let students really understand themselves as learners,\" Carey said . \". As Branigan-
Pipe explained that there is no cycle or pre-
There is no clear theme, no ringing interruption, no set lunch time, and no specific transition other than the student\'s arrival and departure.
Students are encouraged to ask questions, think about possibilities, and find answers.
Recently, a class in the sixth grade genius class, the students used the computer game \"My World\" to carry out the two roads that diverged on a yellow wood mentioned in Robert Frost\'s famous poem.
Through my world\'s ability to allow players to build a 3D environment, students create a flat, easy path along the second road full of twists and turns, twists and thorns.
\"I call it \'virtual action\' because it\'s like a Lego toy-\" Brannigan said --\"Pipe.
\"Being able to build it allows them to understand it better.
Because they built the metaphor, they got it.
\"This engagement is very big.
People see my world as a game;
I see it as a tool.
\"The concentration center doesn\'t look like your typical classroom either.
There is no traditional \"pre-class\" teaching space and no specific seating.
The rooms are set up to encourage small conversation groups, including the arts center, computer lab, container garden, quiet and comfortable meeting space, and even a table where students can operate a 3D printer.
For those students who may need special attention, this is an ideal educational environment, just like those students who are on the other end of the academic field. Branigan-
Pipe says gifted students face the same stigma as disabled students.
\"People think that they will be fine because they have talent, or that we just stick to elitism,\" she said . \".
\"It is important to recognize that many gifted children drop out of school, fail or fail.
No academic talent.
This is intellectual.
We got it wrong.
We often think that gifted children are children who sit in straight rows all day doing math and science and getting.
\"The perception that the center is an elite has led to a weekly decline --in.
From 2: 30 to 4: 30 on Wednesdaym.
Students and their parents are welcome to hang out in the classroom, play my world or use a 3D printer. For 14-year-
Old Jason Amri attending the enrichment center is a pleasure.
Grade 8 Ancaster students are particularly interested in electronics and want to be a software engineer.
Decline this week
Here, Amri leads a small workshop on Arduino programming, a small board for interactive computer projects.
\"I think the structure of education here is much more free than it is in school,\" he said . \".
\"Here we are, we have a whole
Activities during the day, we chat, we discuss-
Our discussion is very rich.
This is a more classic way of teaching at school.
Someone tells you something that you have to remember before you can take the exam.
It\'s not very interesting.
\"Ereilly @ thespec. com 905-526-
2452 | @ EmmaatTheSpecHamilton\'s talented students have less way to go
It makes everything different. Zoe Branigan-
Pipe and Beth Carey lead the Center for enrichment and innovation in public schools at Holbrook Primary School.
This is a special classroom for talented students.
Children who scored around 99 percentile in standardized intelligence tests --
But then every weekschool drop-
The In program is open to all students.
Once a month, gifted students in grades 5 to 8, along with their intellectual peers, are invited to the enrichment center to spend the day
Traditional, asking. based learning.
Students take taxis from various schools in Hamilton to Holbrook, where they gather with other people from their city. Branigan-
Pipe and Carey see 350 talented students from all over the city every month through this program.
The curriculum of the concentration center does not follow the traditional teaching mode. Branigan-
Pipe and Carey said they were there to facilitate the process, not to lead it.
\"Our main goal at the center is to let students really understand themselves as learners,\" Carey said . \". As Branigan-
Pipe explained that there is no cycle or pre-
There is no clear theme, no ringing interruption, no set lunch time, and no specific transition other than the student\'s arrival and departure.
Students are encouraged to ask questions, think about possibilities, and find answers.
Recently, a class in the sixth grade genius class, the students used the computer game \"My World\" to carry out the two roads that diverged on a yellow wood mentioned in Robert Frost\'s famous poem.
Through my world\'s ability to allow players to build a 3D environment, students create a flat, easy path along the second road full of twists and turns, twists and thorns.
\"I call it \'virtual action\' because it\'s like a Lego toy-\" Brannigan said --\"Pipe.
\"Being able to build it allows them to understand it better.
Because they built the metaphor, they got it.
\"This engagement is very big.
People see my world as a game;
I see it as a tool.
\"The concentration center doesn\'t look like your typical classroom either.
There is no traditional \"pre-class\" teaching space and no specific seating.
The rooms are set up to encourage small conversation groups, including the arts center, computer lab, container garden, quiet and comfortable meeting space, and even a table where students can operate a 3D printer.
For those students who may need special attention, this is an ideal educational environment, just like those students who are on the other end of the academic field. Branigan-
Pipe says gifted students face the same stigma as disabled students.
\"People think that they will be fine because they have talent, or that we just stick to elitism,\" she said . \".
\"It is important to recognize that many gifted children drop out of school, fail or fail.
No academic talent.
This is intellectual.
We got it wrong.
We often think that gifted children are children who sit in straight rows all day doing math and science and getting.
\"The perception that the center is an elite has led to a weekly decline --in.
From 2: 30 to 4: 30 on Wednesdaym.
Students and their parents are welcome to hang out in the classroom, play my world or use a 3D printer. For 14-year-
Old Jason Amri attending the enrichment center is a pleasure.
Grade 8 Ancaster students are particularly interested in electronics and want to be a software engineer.
Decline this week
Here, Amri leads a small workshop on Arduino programming, a small board for interactive computer projects.
\"I think the structure of education here is much more free than it is in school,\" he said . \".
\"Here we are, we have a whole
Activities during the day, we chat, we discuss-
Our discussion is very rich.
This is a more classic way of teaching at school.
Someone tells you something that you have to remember before you can take the exam.
It\'s not very interesting.
\"Ereilly @ thespec. com 905-526-
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