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by:Tuowei     2019-08-13
Max Wallace wants to create something for his board game invention.
The software engineer needed to get high-quality 3D printing and scanning equipment, but joked that he could not get his wife to agree to spend tens of thousands of dollars. So the 28-year-
Old Dundas native decided to launch an adventure called the 3D Wizards in which people like him will pay for it on an hourly basis, using advanced technology to make it in an eventit-yourself basis.
His goal is to create his studio in Hamilton.
Hamilton is a great central location.
It is located at the junction of Toronto, Niagara, Brantford, kidina and Guelph.
\"There is no staff at Wallace\'s studio.
The user will book the time online and send the code that is allowed to be entered.
As far as he knows, his model is unique.
Other companies offer 3D printing services, but they have a lot of staff, which increases the cost of users.
The idea dates back to the pioneering era of Internet cafes.
Wallace predicts that when the family has a 3D printer and scanner to replicate the broken shelves of the refrigerator, cups, plates and hangers, his studio may not be necessary at some point.
\"This is the ability I bring to people who will be using their home equipment in 10 years.
\"This is a glimpse of the future,\" he said . \".
The goal of the studio will be serious enthusiasts, inventors
Anyone who has a passion for creating 3D objects, he says.
He will provide coaching and teaching DVDs for those who need help with software and hardware.
The 3D Wizard will include a stereo printing printer that can be reproduced in detail even if the size is small.
According to the resolution, it prints about one to 3 cm height per hour.
The studio will also include a high
Nikon 3D scanners and vacuum chambers will create rubber molds that produce replicas of dozens of printed objects per hour for their own use or sale.
\"I think this will be the star of the show,\" Wallace said . \".
Wallace says he has chosen devices that can provide users with precision and accuracy, ease of use, and low cost.
The scanner generates digital files from physical objects, which costs about $47,000.
\"3D printing is developing, but 3D scanning is still in its infancy.
I really think the scanner is holding back the 3D printer . . . . . . To get close to the high resolution of the 3D printer, you need to spend a lot of money on the scanner.
\"Not everyone wants a physical object, but the opposite process allows Video
For example, the game designer or modifier scans the real object and inserts it into the game.
Wallace, a graduate of Mohawk College who is now developing software for a Niagara company, has started a Kickstarter campaign to raise $125,000 to buy equipment and run the studio for a year.
He offered support a level of service for $20 an hour.
For those who invest $5,000, he will give 250 hours and freeze the price of the 3D Wizards.
He will protect his investment through GPS trackers on the device, surveillance cameras, security monitoring, and authentication for booking studio time.
According to the rules of the crowdfunding website, if he has not reached the target by the end of October.
All the money was returned to the supporters.
Wallace has raised only $300 so far, but he said he was not blocked.
\"It\'s not a question of whether or not this happens, it\'s a question of when or how it happens.
It would be a small setback if Kickstarter didn\'t implement it.
Wallace said he will continue to build contacts and look for other ways to raise the necessary funds.
Mmacleod @ thespec. com 905-526-
3408 | @ meredithmacleodMax Wallace wants to make a work for his board game invention.
The software engineer needed to get high-quality 3D printing and scanning equipment, but joked that he could not get his wife to agree to spend tens of thousands of dollars. So the 28-year-
Old Dundas native decided to launch an adventure called the 3D Wizards in which people like him will pay for it on an hourly basis, using advanced technology to make it in an eventit-yourself basis.
His goal is to create his studio in Hamilton.
Hamilton is a great central location.
It is located at the junction of Toronto, Niagara, Brantford, kidina and Guelph.
\"There is no staff at Wallace\'s studio.
The user will book the time online and send the code that is allowed to be entered.
As far as he knows, his model is unique.
Other companies offer 3D printing services, but they have a lot of staff, which increases the cost of users.
The idea dates back to the pioneering era of Internet cafes.
Wallace predicts that when the family has a 3D printer and scanner to replicate the broken shelves of the refrigerator, cups, plates and hangers, his studio may not be necessary at some point.
\"This is the ability I bring to people who will be using their home equipment in 10 years.
\"This is a glimpse of the future,\" he said . \".
The goal of the studio will be serious enthusiasts, inventors
Anyone who has a passion for creating 3D objects, he says.
He will provide coaching and teaching DVDs for those who need help with software and hardware.
The 3D Wizard will include a stereo printing printer that can be reproduced in detail even if the size is small.
According to the resolution, it prints about one to 3 cm height per hour.
The studio will also include a high
Nikon 3D scanners and vacuum chambers will create rubber molds that produce replicas of dozens of printed objects per hour for their own use or sale.
\"I think this will be the star of the show,\" Wallace said . \".
Wallace says he has chosen devices that can provide users with precision and accuracy, ease of use, and low cost.
The scanner generates digital files from physical objects, which costs about $47,000.
\"3D printing is developing, but 3D scanning is still in its infancy.
I really think the scanner is holding back the 3D printer . . . . . . To get close to the high resolution of the 3D printer, you need to spend a lot of money on the scanner.
\"Not everyone wants a physical object, but the opposite process allows Video
For example, the game designer or modifier scans the real object and inserts it into the game.
Wallace, a graduate of Mohawk College who is now developing software for a Niagara company, has started a Kickstarter campaign to raise $125,000 to buy equipment and run the studio for a year.
He offered support a level of service for $20 an hour.
For those who invest $5,000, he will give 250 hours and freeze the price of the 3D Wizards.
He will protect his investment through GPS trackers on the device, surveillance cameras, security monitoring, and authentication for booking studio time.
According to the rules of the crowdfunding website, if he has not reached the target by the end of October.
All the money was returned to the supporters.
Wallace has raised only $300 so far, but he said he was not blocked.
\"It\'s not a question of whether or not this happens, it\'s a question of when or how it happens.
It would be a small setback if Kickstarter didn\'t implement it.
Wallace said he will continue to build contacts and look for other ways to raise the necessary funds.
Mmacleod @ thespec. com 905-526-
3408 | @ meredithmacleodMax Wallace wants to make a work for his board game invention.
The software engineer needed to get high-quality 3D printing and scanning equipment, but joked that he could not get his wife to agree to spend tens of thousands of dollars. So the 28-year-
Old Dundas native decided to launch an adventure called the 3D Wizards in which people like him will pay for it on an hourly basis, using advanced technology to make it in an eventit-yourself basis.
His goal is to create his studio in Hamilton.
Hamilton is a great central location.
It is located at the junction of Toronto, Niagara, Brantford, kidina and Guelph.
\"There is no staff at Wallace\'s studio.
The user will book the time online and send the code that is allowed to be entered.
As far as he knows, his model is unique.
Other companies offer 3D printing services, but they have a lot of staff, which increases the cost of users.
The idea dates back to the pioneering era of Internet cafes.
Wallace predicts that when the family has a 3D printer and scanner to replicate the broken shelves of the refrigerator, cups, plates and hangers, his studio may not be necessary at some point.
\"This is the ability I bring to people who will be using their home equipment in 10 years.
\"This is a glimpse of the future,\" he said . \".
The goal of the studio will be serious enthusiasts, inventors
Anyone who has a passion for creating 3D objects, he says.
He will provide coaching and teaching DVDs for those who need help with software and hardware.
The 3D Wizard will include a stereo printing printer that can be reproduced in detail even if the size is small.
According to the resolution, it prints about one to 3 cm height per hour.
The studio will also include a high
Nikon 3D scanners and vacuum chambers will create rubber molds that produce replicas of dozens of printed objects per hour for their own use or sale.
\"I think this will be the star of the show,\" Wallace said . \".
Wallace says he has chosen devices that can provide users with precision and accuracy, ease of use, and low cost.
The scanner generates digital files from physical objects, which costs about $47,000.
\"3D printing is developing, but 3D scanning is still in its infancy.
I really think the scanner is holding back the 3D printer . . . . . . To get close to the high resolution of the 3D printer, you need to spend a lot of money on the scanner.
\"Not everyone wants a physical object, but the opposite process allows Video
For example, the game designer or modifier scans the real object and inserts it into the game.
Wallace, a graduate of Mohawk College who is now developing software for a Niagara company, has started a Kickstarter campaign to raise $125,000 to buy equipment and run the studio for a year.
He offered support a level of service for $20 an hour.
For those who invest $5,000, he will give 250 hours and freeze the price of the 3D Wizards.
He will protect his investment through GPS trackers on the device, surveillance cameras, security monitoring, and authentication for booking studio time.
According to the rules of the crowdfunding website, if he has not reached the target by the end of October.
All the money was returned to the supporters.
Wallace has raised only $300 so far, but he said he was not blocked.
\"It\'s not a question of whether or not this happens, it\'s a question of when or how it happens.
It would be a small setback if Kickstarter didn\'t implement it.
Wallace said he will continue to build contacts and look for other ways to raise the necessary funds.
Mmacleod @ thespec. com 905-526-
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